IFComp 2014: Raik   Leave a comment

Vince Twelve’s What Linus Bruckman Sees When His Eyes Are Closed is the first time I’ve seen a “dual mechanic” where two different games are played simultaneously.

linusshot

Essentially, the same thing happens across the games, it is just conveyed in two entirely different genres and art styles at the same time.

Harry Giles’s Raik does the same trick (for part of the game, at least), but is much sneaker about it.

Read the rest of this entry »

Posted October 17, 2014 by Jason Dyer in Interactive Fiction

Tagged with

IFComp 2014: Jesse Stavro’s Doorway   Leave a comment

“Okay.” Is all you decide to say. The man grins and you can tell at that moment that he is insane. Then, like a ton of bricks hitting you, you realize the man before you is also a time-traveler. He’s a Tourist and, by his menacing grin and crazy eyes, is more-than-likely an Absurdist; here only to cause chaos and confusion.

Jesse Stavro’s Doorway by Marshal Tenner Winter is a parser-based journey through time where the protagonist is trying to find his friend Jesse.

Read the rest of this entry »

Posted October 17, 2014 by Jason Dyer in Interactive Fiction

Tagged with

IFComp 2014: Building the Right Stuff   Leave a comment

We at IAF would like to take this opportunity to thank you for your efforts, and to assure you that should your ship crash, combust or otherwise result in your untimely demise, the insurance payout delivered to your next of kin will cover most of the costs

Laura Mitchell’s Building the Right Stuff is a click-interface game as a Windows executable. It involves travelling through space with with a computer, GENE.

geneinterface

Read the rest of this entry »

Posted October 16, 2014 by Jason Dyer in Interactive Fiction

Tagged with

IFComp 2014: Tower   Leave a comment

A head-high mirror is hanging on the west wall. As you look at yourself, you get the feeling of looking into the eyes of a stranger. For a moment you wonder what is closer to reality – the reflection in the mirror or the place of your physical existence. You almost expect the stranger to talk to you and wonder if he would answer to a question.

Tower is an parser-based puzzle game with mostly abstract puzzles.

If you’ll allow me a brief tangent–

Read the rest of this entry »

Posted October 16, 2014 by Jason Dyer in Interactive Fiction

Tagged with

IFComp 2014: Paradox Corps   Leave a comment

“We cannot say. Time is not truly fixed.” It turns fully away from you. “Were you admiring our deep time explorer?”

You look at the giant thing. “I’ve never seen anything like it.”

“No. You have not.” Suddenly a bright blue light appears on the dark thing; you instinctively step back. Was it there all along, darkened? Or did it open, or…appear? You’re not sure. “Perhaps one day the Paradox Corps will undertake similiar initiatives. On that day, we may meet again.”

Paradox Corps by John Evans is written in ChoiceScript (meaning it uses Javascript and is playable on any platform). It involves a “time agency” type plot where agents travel in time to fix paradoxes caused by “Chaos Agents”. The author cites Doctor Who (among other things) as an influence.

Read the rest of this entry »

Posted October 15, 2014 by Jason Dyer in Interactive Fiction

Tagged with

IFComp 2014: One Night Stand   Leave a comment

“Listen. Something really funny happened to me… I was pretty drunk last night and I can’t seem to… remember his name,” you smile.
“And?”
“Can you tell me his name, please?”
“No.”
“Why?” you ask.
“Because I don’t like you.”

Giannis G. Georgiou’s One Night Stand is a parser game in Quest. The plot can mostly be inferred from the excerpt above. This review contains spoilers.

Read the rest of this entry »

Posted October 14, 2014 by Jason Dyer in Interactive Fiction

Tagged with

IFComp 2014: Caroline   Leave a comment

caroline

Caroline by Kristian Kronstrand is a choice-game where you still type things in. That is, you have one or maybe two choices but you need to reproduce what is in boldface (exactly) to move on. I suppose the intent was to avoid the click-click-click syndrome that can affect choice-works where it is too easy to jump by story material without thinking about it.

I did have typos sometimes but I type fast enough it wasn’t too frustrating for me; still it makes me wonder if they’re some middle ground between instant clicking and long typing. (There is also one payoff spot which I’ll write about in a moment.)

After this point are plot spoilers—

Read the rest of this entry »

Posted October 13, 2014 by Jason Dyer in Interactive Fiction

Tagged with

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.