Philosopher’s Quest: A series of unfortunate events   2 comments

I have made actual genuine progress (really!) but for the moment I thought I’d share the general feeling of playing Philosopher’s Quest.

. . .

> se
You find yourself in a short angular passage, with exits northwest and south.
There is a very smelly and ancient piece of gorgonzola here.
> s
The smell of the mouldy cheese hits your lungs like a sledgehammer, and you choke rapidly to death on the fumes.
Oh dear. You’re dead.

. . .

There is a small unopenable metal case on the floor.
> get case
As you pick up the case, you notice that it starts ticking.
OK.
.
.
(later)
.
.
> w
The case you are carrying emits a loud CLICK.
You’re at Piccadilly Circus.
> e
You don’t feel a thing as the bomb you are carrying blows you to pieces.
Oh dear. You’re dead.

. . .

You are in a bare anteroom. The exit to the north bears an overhead inscription, decorated with crossed human bones. It reads: Abandon most hope some of ye who enter here.
To the south lies a murky hole. There seems to be some sort of detection apparatus above the hole, but far too high for you to reach (or jump to).
> n
As you enter the room, your movement activates an air pressure sensor somewhere. Five spears shoot out of the wall at random intervals, at various heights. You simply can’t dodge them all, and one gets you.
Oh dear. You’re dead.

. . .

You enter the sea and begin to swim. Almost immediately the source of the buzzing noise becomes obvious – it’s lots of bees, all heading for you! After a few stings, you get the point and duck under the water. The bees hover overhead, waiting. You eventually run out of breath and drown.
Oh dear. You’re dead.

. . .

As you move along the plank, your weight causes it to tilt rapidly downwards, throwing you off into the air. You hit the ground exceptionally hard, killing yourself instantly.
Oh dear. You’re dead.

. . .

The old lady stares at your possessions as you enter. “You didn’t bring me my dog!” she cries, looking most disappointed. “I shall retire to my boudoir and never speak to you again!” She wheels her wheelchair off into the murky passage to the north. There is a sudden cry of “AAGH!” from the passageway, and an equally sudden thump. Everything goes still.
You are in the living room of the bungalow. The windows are boarded up in here, too. The only exits are north, through a dark passageway, and south to the kitchen.
> n
You are in the hall of the bungalow. To the north there has been a small earthquake recently, and a big pit has opened up. The old lady is lying at the bottom. She must have stumbled onto the pit in the dark, fallen in, and broken every bone in her body, poor dear! The only safe exit is back south.
> n
You stumbled onto the old lady’s pit, fell in, and broke every bone in your body.
Oh dear. You’re dead.

. . .

> n
You suddenly hear a dull rumbling noise and the floor starts to shake. Into the room stampedes an enormous elephant. It runs over you without noticing, squashing you in the process. Oh dear. You’re dead.

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Posted February 16, 2016 by Jason Dyer in Interactive Fiction

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2 responses to “Philosopher’s Quest: A series of unfortunate events

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  1. Peter Killworth, co-author of Philosopher’s Quest, seems to have positively revelled in thinking up cruel puzzles for the player to solve (or, more likely, die trying).

    Here are some choice quotes from him, on puzzle design: http://www.stardot.org.uk/forums/viewtopic.php?f=7&t=6701&p=93392#p93246

    They’re taken from his book How To Write Adventure Games, which has quite a bit of detail on the development of the plank puzzle you fell foul of: http://www.mocagh.org/softguide/writeadventuregames.pdf

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